Caroline's Post-Honduras Reflection

Caroline Nochasak from Nain, Labrador, had the chance to participate in this year’s Global Youth Leaders Tour, in the country of Honduras. During her time there, Caroline learned a lot when it came to the differences between her life in Canada and life in Honduras. 

ACICWhat part of this trip to Honduras affected you the most? Were you expecting to have the reactions you did to this? Why? 

CarolineThe part of the trip that affected me the most was when I saw the poverty with my own eyes and that's when the reality of privilege became so real to me. I also learnt that there are so many people who are making a huge difference in developing countries. This makes me think of the possibilities I can achieve here in Canada. 

 

ACICWhat was the most positive part about your trip? Why?  

 CarolineI think one of the most positive parts of the tour was when everyone was taking part in activities were just so friendly and willing to teach and learn! It was such a great thing to see and it was definitely a positive learning experience. 

 

 ACICWas there anything that you were expecting to happen that did not? Or anything that you were not expecting to happen but did?  

CarolineThroughout the whole tour I kept an open mind and tried to expect the unexpected! But the one thing that surprises everyone was when we were canoeing/kayaking and Egan and his counterpart fell into the river! 

ACICIf you could go back to Honduras for another three days, what would you dedicate more time to that you had experienced in your time there? 

CarolineIf I had three extra days in Honduras I would definitely want to spend more time with the Honduran counterparts to hear their thoughts on things. I would spend more time with the people I've met and just get to know them and their country a little better. 

 

ACICHow do you feel you’ve impacted the people that you met in Honduras? Why? 

Caroline: What I brought with me on the tour I think has given the people I've met in Honduras a look into Canada and how I live in my Inuit community. With my experience in Arctic health research, social justice, and traditional Inuit living I believe I brought some knowledge to Honduras. This may have helped the Canadians and Hondurans realize that there are a lot of differences between both countries, along with its similarities. 

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Egan's Post-Honduras Reflection

Youth leader and 17-year-old Hubbard’sNova Scotia resident, Egan John, was one of the six people who took part in this year’s Global Youth Leaders Tour. Taking place, in Honduras, a country he had yet to visit, Egan learned a lot.  

ACIC: What part of this trip to Honduras affected you the most? Were you expecting to have the reactions you did to this? Why? 

Egan:  I think what affected me the most was the shift from going to Salado to Utillia and the different cultural to tourist land all in the same country. It hit me because we all got used to staying in an area where basic needs was a challenge such as showering and only getting a limit choice on food, then going to an area where we could eat what we have back home here in Canada. 


ACIC: What was the most positive part about your trip? Why? 

Egan: The most positive part about my trip was getting a chance to learn about the people we met and as well teach at the same time. I took back a lot of the things I learned over in Honduras and taught some of my friends, as well as that it also had a positive impact on me with taking my time on things and just taking a step back to look at life and being more grateful. 

ACIC: Was there anything that you were expecting to happen that did not? Or anything that you were not expecting to happen but did? 

Egan: No, everything that I had on my brain going to Honduras happened. 

ACIC: If you could go back to Honduras for another three days, what would you dedicate more time to that you had experienced in your time there? 

Egan:  If I had to go back, I would dedicate more time to learning more about their culture and playing with the kids and seeing how their education system works in Honduras. I would also travel and see how I can get involved with issues I like and that fit in my field. 

ACIC: How do you feel you’ve impacted the people that you met in Honduras? Why? 

Egan: I don't think I left an impact more than they did on me, making connections with the people from the canoe trip and getting to know what their lives are like as well as sharing what mine is like. I feel the only impact I left with them is care and love because everyone was so nice and friendly I tried to sit down and talk to them just to get to know them better and "try" to understand what they went through on a daily basis.  

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Drew's Post-Honduras Reflection

Drew Dalziel, from Prince Edward Island, is one of the four youth that took part in this year’s Global Youth Leader's Tour in Honduras. The tour took place from July 7-17, 2015.

 

Drew reflects on her time in Honduras:

 

ACIC: What part of this trip to Honduras affected you the most? Were you expecting to have the reactions you did to this? Why?

Drew: The thing that affected me the most in Honduras was definitely the difference between the rich and poor. Before I left I read in a book "The rich are rich, and the poor are poor" but I never expected it to be such a big gap between the both. It hit me really hard the whole time during the trip.

 

ACIC: What was the most positive part about your trip? Why?

Drew: The most positive part of the trip was for sure meeting people from the community and interacting with youth and spending the morning with the school kids and seeing the smile on their beautiful faces.

 

ACIC: Was there anything that you were expecting to happen that did not?

Or anything that you were not expecting to happen but it did?

Drew: I was expecting to get sick at some point during the trip, I was honestly prepared to be sick at some point and it never happened.

 

ACIC: If you could go back to Honduras for another three days, what would you dedicate more time to that you had experienced in your time there?

Drew: If I could dedicate three more days to something in Honduras it would for sure without a doubt to stay in the community of Saltillo with all of the people we became friends with.

 

ACIC: How do you feel you’ve impacted the people that you met in Honduras? Why?

Drew: I hope my enthusiasm for learning about their culture and country have left them believing that youth truly care about making a difference.


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Jocelyn's Post-Honduras Reflection

ACIC hosted the “Global Youth Leaders Tour” (GYLT) along with the Falls Brook Centre from July 7-17. This year’s GYLT took place in Honduras. Since being back, the four youth leaders who participated in the trip to Honduras have had some time to reflect. 

Jocelyn Leblanc from Dalhousie, New Brunswick tells us about his experiences.

ACIC: What part of this trip to Honduras affected you the most?

Jocelyn: When I saw nine-year-old children bumping the restaurant window that I sat at to have food, I was greatly touched.

ACIC: Were you expecting to have the reactions you did to this? Why?

Jocelyn: I had no plans that this would happen. What I find most unfortunate is that I could not help these young children and I felt completely powerless in this situation.

ACIC: What was the most positive part about your trip? Why?

Jocelyn: Having the chance to share three days with four young Hondurans is certainly an experience I will remember. The fun and different stories we experienced together will certainly stay inked on our list of best memories. Together we descended down a bridge and we trekked 40 km in a canoe and saw some very special animals.

ACIC: Was there anything that you were expecting to happen that did not?

Jocelyn: I thought I would have a culture shock and be very tired at first, but the people we met were welcoming and reassuring to our Canadian team.

ACIC: If you could go back to Honduras for another three days, what would you dedicate more time to that you had experienced in your time there?

Jocelyn: I would have tried to talk more with the multiple guides who accompanied us because they were very interesting people, but sometimes I hesitated to ask my questions in case they would judge me.

ACIC: How do you feel you’ve impacted the people that you met in Honduras?

Jocelyn: I do not really know what impact I had to Hondurans. But one thing is for sure, I always remained myself. I also tried to always make people proud of where they came from and who they were. I tried to share things that were happening in Acadia and Canada, while being attentive to others.

We are happy that you had the positive experience you did, Jocelyn! 

 

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Honduras July 16&17

The Honduran Journey for our youth leaders as well as Stephanie from ACIC and Rosie from the Falls Brook Centre has come to an end. 

July 16 (Caroline): "Swimming and breathing with the fishes who live in the second most largest reef in the world! Overcame fears and tribulations today."

July 17 (Egan): "It was hard to say goodbye to Honduras, and it left us physically and emotionally drained."

Honduras July 14&15

Here is an update of what our youth, Stephanie from ACIC and Rosie from the Falls Brook Centre, have been up to during the Global Youth Leaders Tour in Honduras!


July 14 (Drew): spending the morning enjoying our time at the Sambo Creek hot springs!


July 15 (Jocelyn): Utila: une petite île, mais beaucoup de biodiversité/ Utila: a small island, but lots of biodiversity.

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Honduras Thus Far (July 8-13)

Today it is July 15, which marks 8 days since the youth, Stephanie and Rosie have been in Honduras. Here is a little bit of what they have been up to:

July 8 (drew): We finally made it... The landscape is so beautiful and breathtaking. 

 July 9 (Jocelyn): Si peu de gens font une si grande différence/ So few people are making such a big difference!

July 10 (Egan): We had a terrible sleep tenting on a concrete floor, but a major journey was ahead and we needed to tackle it!

July 11 (Caroline): Starting off the day exhausted and enduring through another day of obstacles. Enjoying and learning every second!

July 12 (Rosie): An informative day spent learning about mangrove restoration ended in shared laughter at the community movie night in Salado Barra.

July 13 (Stephanie): Saying sad goodbyes in Salado Barra and spending the night at Don Pepe's beautiful house on the Río Cangrejal.

We hope that the rest of the trip is just as amazing as the past week has been!
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Global Youth Leaders Tour Blog: FUCSA

 

FUNDACIÓN CUERO Y SALADO, also known as “FUCSA”, is one of the organizations the Global Youth Leaders Tour will be visiting in Honduras. They are a partner of Falls Brook Centre (FBC). ACIC is excited to be working with this organization for the GYLT.

FUCSA is a foundation located in Honduras. Through activities such as ecotourism, sustainable fisheries management, and watershed restoration, the foundation aims to protect and conserve the native biodiversity of the zone while working closely with local people who rely on the natural resources of the area for survival.

Currently, the organization is managing a 13,000 hectare wildlife refuge and the small communities which live within the area.

In partnership with the Falls Brook Centre, FUSCA has hosted 7 Canadian interns between 2010 and 2013. The evaluations of the internship placement have all been positive. Rosamund Mosse, who will be travelling to Honduras along with ACIC and our youth leaders, did her internship with FUCSA, and now works with the Falls Brook Centre.

Visit: www.fucsa.blogspot.com for more information